ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

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ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Lowrider Lincoln » Sat Jun 15, 2013 5:57 pm

ITV are screening the third series of Long Lost Family. First episode airs Monday 17/06/2013 at 21:00.
Presented by Nicky Campbell & Davina McCall.

This is the program that not only changed my thoughts about my adoption, but actually gave me courage to start research into my own background, which has now resulted in me now in the process of trying to trace my birth family.

Up until the first series a couple of years ago my adoption meant absolutely nothing to me. I had never ever wanted to know anything about my pre adoption life. I had only felt irritated and annoyed if anyone suggested I should trace birth family. I had no interest or need to.

The programs had a huge effect on me. It was seeing both sides of each adoption story that made me question myself, just because I hadn't wanted to know anything didn't necessarily mean that BM or siblings would feel the same way. Also if my opinion could be so radically altered, perhaps birth family members may have also watched and wondered about me.

I know the program focusses on reunion, not all adopees or birth parents want that. I know the program follows a set formula, its almost predictable how it ends. But it is the only program to tackle the issues of adoption reunion, and tracing.

I'm looking forward to the third series. Anyone's thoughts or comments could be added here as the series progresses.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby ladyarcher » Mon Jun 17, 2013 8:25 pm

Getting really worried about the fireman........how is he going to find it, to relate to a b.mother who is only sixteen years older than him.....this is going the way of some of the people on the board,.......in that b.mother and b.father have eventually married.......

LA
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby skyebluepink » Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:12 pm

What I would love them to make is a show where they return to the people they have reunited to show what ha happened since. I expect many of them are still happy but have a feeling that some of those reunions may have broken down, so for that reason it's likely they wouldn't make such a show - it's not warm fuzzy tv. But at least it would be realistic and give people thinking of embarking on a reunion a reality check.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby ladyarcher » Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:29 pm

Looks like it might be ok ....... his b.father regrets the choices he made over the adoption so long ago......they were both young of course......although the b.father was a good bit older than the b.mother.....it was still young for those days.......difficult to grasp how views have changed from then to now..

I know some of you will have read this story before, but I will repeat it because it is relevant to the programme this evening.......Davina said that it was unusual and very rare to find that a couple had subsequently married.......it's not that rare, as we know from posts on this board, and I knew first hand, someone to whom it applied......

....when doing waking night duty, nearly 20 years ago in an old folks home, I was working with a nurse who told me about having her baby girl adopted......because her parents would not support her, and wanted her to follow the nursing training which she had just been accepted for.......they said her boyfriend would never marry her........in fact, they married after she had finished her training ......... they had a son........but the adoption of their daughter was never talked about between them........so sad........she was able to talk to me about it because I have always slipped 'adoption' into conversations when ever I can......just because so many people cannot talk about it to the people they are close to.......and of course, when you are doing 'nights' together, you chat in rather a different way......nights are long, and you do frequent 'rounds' of the old people checking on them, and answer bells for those able to ring.......but there are quiet gaps when you talk in a more intimate way than when you are on 'days'.....

The desperately sad thing was that they were never able to talk about it together.......her husband would not refer to it at all, the subject was totally taboo........she hurt - obviously he hurt too ..... but his way of dealing with it was silence ...... she dreaded that one day soon their daughter would knock on their door because she would soon be eighteen and might be wanting answers....... wanting to know why she had been given away,........ what would her reaction be to find that they had had a son later, after they had married.........another thing, of course, was that the son did not know he had an older full sister ...... that too, would have to be explained if their daughter found them....

...I often wonder what, if anything, has happened........ I did not deliberately keep in touch with the nurse, although we would occasionally see each other in town and have a 'how are you?'......'fine thanks, how are you' conversation.......also my older daughter was in her mid teens and knew the son slightly, although they were not at the same school, but even so I had to be careful what I said..........we moved away a year later............the daughter would be around or approaching forty now.......did she ever search, either at 18, or perhaps maybe now, as women do often search at the age of forty-ish...... I wonder.......all I do know is that her b.mother never forgot her for a moment......

The silence by the b.father/husband, and secret anguish of the b.mother......were duplicated in the two attitudes of the couple in New Zealand......the b.father there acknowledging that he had been wrong in pushing the adoption.......in my friend's case it was her parents, I think if I remember rightly her father was a Minister ..... it was her parents that pushed the adoption.....did they ever wonder about their grand-daughter as they looked at their grandson..........

LA
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby ladyarcher » Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:36 pm

Good idea SkyBP ...... perhaps we could suggest some candidates ourselves ........ I have not seen all the series, just a few here and there, but I think all the ones I have caught have, as you say, been 'fuzzy happy' .......

LA
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby skyebluepink » Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:57 pm

I agree that it's far more common to find birth parents who have ended up together than I ever imagined. I remember in my naive days (!) the night before I met my bm, reading "the adoption reunion handbook" which I had hastily downloaded and skim read on my kindle - I hadn't stumbled across this site back then. There was a chapter on the difficulties that can arise if birth parents are together and I vividly remember skipping that chapter because I thought it didn't apply to me (I didn't know a single thing about my bf unit the day I met bm). Incidentally, the bf in tonight's LLF reminded me of my own - forced the bm into something that she always regretted and never forgave him for, and it was never spoken about since, a result of his own guilt. Those who have read my many postings may recognise something very similar in my own situation. I do wonder if bm and bf were watching, though I suspect they have deliberately watched something else instead.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Lowrider Lincoln » Tue Jun 18, 2013 9:07 pm

Very distressing to hear how Susan's father refused to give permission to her Doctors to perform a C -section as her baby was in breach. She said "He said It'll teach her a lesson.If she died in labor, then so be it." F------ Heartless Bastard. It was only 1966 not 1866.

A happy ending, but a long time overdue. Bless her.

S3E1 RECAP

Sixty eight year old Susan Udy is searching for her daughter who she gave up for adoption when she was 21. For almost fifty years Sue has carried the pain of this with her and has held onto the hope that she would one day find her daughter. More than anything she is desperate to know that she has had a better life than the one she could offer her.

Susan, who now lives with her husband in a small Devonshire village, tells Long Lost Family of her difficult upbringing in the 1950s. Her authoritarian father cast a dark shadow over her home life so when she met a good looking man in a military uniform she was swept away. The two quickly became an item.
She says: “We hit it off straight away, just like wildfire really. It was complete passion. He just knew how to treat a girl and make her feel so very special.”
It wasn’t long, however, before Susan discovered her boyfriend was in fact married with three children. Though shocked at first, he reassured Susan that he was separated from his wife and that the two had a future together. Susan’s father, on the other hand, was less accepting. On finding out her boyfriend was a married man, he disowned his daughter, packed her bags, and sent her away.
Undeterred and following her heart, Susan tells the series that she ran away to Bristol with her boyfriend, settling happily into a rented flat together. Just six months later Susan discovered she was pregnant. However, her hopes for a future together were dashed when she told her boyfriend the news. Refusing to contemplate a future together as a family, once again Susan’s bags were packed and she was driven to a mother and baby home where she was left on the doorstep. She never saw her boyfriend again.
Alone in the world and without her parents to turn to for support, Susan felt there was only one option open to her.
She tells the programme: “I had no job, no home, no future. I just knew the whole way through the pregnancy there was no other option than to have the baby adopted. There was no other way. The day I actually had to leave her was the hardest thing I have ever done in my life.”
Shortly before her death, Susan’s mother expressed remorse that she hadn’t been able to support her daughter through her ordeal. She gave Susan her engagement ring asking her to give it to her daughter, who Susan had named Kerry, if she ever managed to find her. Susan carried the ring with her in the hope that one day she would be reunited with Kerry.
Long Lost Family manages to trace Kerry, discovering that her name had been changed to Andrea. Nicky visits Andrea at her home in Bristol, just a few miles from the hospital in which she was born. The search comes as a complete shock to Andrea, who had a wonderful adoption and never felt there was anything missing in her life. On reading the letter Susan has written to Andrea, she begins to recognise a desire she never knew she had.
Andrea has a fantastic relationship with her adoptive mother who fully supported her decision to meet her birth mother. She is interviewed for the programme and says: “I said to her, ‘I feel it’s put something into your life that you were missing and didn’t realise you were missing.’”
The programme is with Susan when Davina visits her to tell her the news that Andrea has been found. Visibly relieved that Andrea had a happy adoption, Susan is overjoyed at the prospect of being able to finally give her the ring that she has carried with her all these years.
Long Lost Family is with Susan and Andrea when they are finally reunited.
Last edited by Lowrider Lincoln on Tue Jun 18, 2013 9:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Lowrider Lincoln » Tue Jun 18, 2013 9:30 pm

The look on Alan's face was priceless as he was told his BM had married BF after he was placed for adoption, then to be told he had a full sister too. Finding then reunited with BF after discovering he was the sole individual responsible for that decision. That's a bittersweet pill to swallow.

S3E1 RECAP

Fireman Alan Ross-Harper is searching for his birth mother who gave him up for adoption in 1958. All he has to cling onto is his adoption file which gives a few details of the mother he is desperate to find.

Alan, who lives with his son and partner, Elaine, found out that he was adopted when he was twelve years old. He was told he was special and chosen, and he remembers having a very happy childhood.
Alan tells the programme that it was only when he got married and his wife gave birth to their first child that it really hit home what his birth mother must have gone through when she gave him up.
He says: “It’s just this immediate overwhelming love coming straight out, and protection straight out, and I just thought to myself that my birth mother must have had that. I can’t believe that she didn’t.”
Alan says that as time went on, and his own family grew, so too did his desire to find his birth mother and uncover the truth about why she had given him up.
Long Lost Family explains that once they have reached the age of eighteen, a child who has been adopted is legally entitled to access his or her adoption file. The files usually contain scant information about the place of birth and the name of the birth mother.
However, Alan was shocked at the amount of information in his file which revealed not only his mother’s name and age but also, unusually, the name of his father. The social worker’s report also went on to describe how the decision to give their baby up for adoption was very much influenced by Alan’s birth father. It also stated that this decision could damage any long-term relationship his mother and father hoped to have.
After discovering this information, Alan did everything he could to track his mother down. His first thought was that she might have gone on to marry his birth father but he could find no trace of this.
Alan explains how he was forced to end his search when his wife became ill with a brain tumour. He looked after her for nine years before she died. Alan adds that after his wife’s death family seemed even more important.
He adds: “I feel now the time is right. I need to know from her the truth, did she love me at the time? Or did she feel as though I was a mistake and that I just had to be dealt with? I just want to know her true feelings at the time and what she was going through.”
Long Lost Family’s search for Alan’s mum was long and difficult but eventually she was traced to New Zealand where she lives. Incredibly, the search also revealed a first for Long Lost Family, Alan’s birth mother went on to marry, and is still married, to his birth father and they have a daughter, Alan’s sister, Jackie.
Nicky visits the family to tell them of Alan’s search and Alan’s mum reveals that she has never stopped thinking about Alan.
The programme is with Alan when Davina visits him to reveal that his parents are still together and he is overjoyed to discover he has a sister.
Long Lost Family is with the family at the emotional moment when they are all finally reunited.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby ladyarcher » Tue Jun 18, 2013 10:41 pm

Interestingly Alan's b.mother did say that Alan's adoption had been a taboo subject between her and her husband, and that she did resent that he had pressurised her into the adoption..........however the husband did say that he had been wrong and that he regretted it, and that his way of dealing with it was to 'not think about it.'........and not talk about it either of course, however he only said this to the 'team', not to his son.....

...I did think that when they showed the reunion with the father, that the father should have said he was sorry......don't know what others felt, and of course you can only see what the camera and the producer gives you.......but I felt that the b.father was rather parroting what he knew he ought to say, rather than being deeply moved by it all.......but maybe I am being harsh, as I said, you only get to see what they want you to see...........and despite the fact that they are everywhere, not everyone is comfortable in front of a camera............ however I just did not feel sincerity in his reactions.......

With the lady from Devon.......what, I wonder, would the reaction have been if the team had found the b.father ...... surely to make an honest programme they should have traced him too.......and said, 'what were you thinking of....leaving her at the mother and baby home......' surely some answers were due, and what must the girl have thought, knowing that her b.father had acted like that....

...but 'wow'.....and 'wow' again........wasn't her adoptive mother magnificent....... if all a.mothers were like that, probably boards like this would not be necessary .........

LA
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Lowrider Lincoln » Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:54 pm

Helen,s father disassociated her from her family,only allowing her back in if she placed her child up for adoption. At only 17 years of age she had an unfair choice to make, either a single parent on welfare or childless mother. Between a rock and a hard place.

S3 E2 RECAP

Helen, who lives with her husband in the heart of Sheffield, is searching for her son. Helen and her husband have two grown up sons, but whenever she is asked how many children she has, in her mind she always says three - having never forgotten the baby boy she felt she had to give up for adoption 35 years ago.
Helen tells LLF that she grew up in a loving family, with sisters, her mum and her businessman father who doted on his children.
She says: “It seems sunny to me, my childhood. Mum was always there when we came home from school. Dad always had time for us…I think he had high hopes for us. We were his princesses, we were his little girls.”
When Helen was 16 she met a local boy and not long after the relationship began Helen realised she was pregnant. The idea of telling her parents was too difficult for her to contemplate.
She says: “The stigma of having an unmarried pregnant daughter… because he was such a proud man, I knew that just wasn’t going to go down well.”
When Helen was 5 months pregnant she could no longer keep it to herself – and her father reacted in just the way she had predicted.
She says: “I can remember him just looking at me and saying, ‘Just get out, just get out…’ He didn’t want anything more to do with me, he just wanted me to go.”
She was terrified; her father told her that if she wanted to keep the baby she would not be allowed to come home.
For girls in Helen’s situation there were a growing number of options as from 1977 councils were obliged to give single mums accommodation. For Helen, this would have meant moving to one of Sheffield’s notorious high-rise flats.
Envisaging the life she would have with her baby, Helen took the only option she felt was available to her and decided that as soon as her baby was born she would give it up for adoption.
She says: “I just felt he had the right to two parents and the right to have a good start in life…I could love him but sometimes that’s just not enough.”
As soon as she had made the decision to give her baby up, Helen had to battle with painful feelings of attachment.
She says: “To think I’m having this baby for someone else, almost as a surrogacy. That is how I dealt with it, even though it’s going to be horrendously heart-breaking for me.”
Helen did the only thing she knew she could and wrote him a letter in the hope that one day he would understand and forgive her.
She says: “I did write the letter many many times. For me it needed to be perfect.”
Desperate for reassurance that she made the right decision and with 35 years having passed since she wrote that heartfelt letter, Helen turned to Long Lost Family for help. She wrote her son one more letter in the hope that he will be able to read it.
Working with a specialist intermediary and adoption support agent, LLF discovered Helen’s son is now called Dave, and lives in Harpenden.
Nicky travels to meet him where he lives with his partner and their two sons. Dave tells Nicky that he never received the letter Helen wrote when he was a baby, and until he heard about Helen’s search he had never considered searching for his birth mother.
Having learnt that he was adopted when he was just nine years old, Dave had a wonderful upbringing and happy family life. Out of loyalty to his birth parents it is only since they have passed away that he could consider meeting his birth mother.
When Dave reads the letter that Helen wrote to him he is incredibly moved. He acknowledges he still feels a sense of betrayal towards his adoptive mother, but wants to meet Helen and reassure her that she did the right thing.
When Davina visits Helen she is able to give her the news she has wanted to hear for 35 years. In reading Dave’s reply she can, for the first time, put to rest those fearful feelings she has been carrying for so many years.
Long Lost Family are with Helen and Dave when they are reunited in a central Sheffield hotel, close to where she gave birth to him.
Last edited by Lowrider Lincoln on Mon Jun 24, 2013 11:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Lowrider Lincoln » Mon Jun 24, 2013 11:07 pm

Wendy,s grandfather intercepted her BF,s letters to her mum, thus he presumed he wasn't wanted or needed as a father. Years later to discover they had both been searching. Another case of interfering relatives. Very emotional reunion, made me cry tears of happiness for them both.

S3 E2 RECAP

Thirty-six-year old Wendy O’Hagan grew up in the Bogside area of Northern Ireland at the height of the Troubles.

Wendy tells LLF that throughout her childhood she has memories of witnessing brutal violence in the streets around her home. Then, when Wendy was seven, she discovered the shocking news that the man she thought was her father, wasn’t.

Wendy explains that one night, whilst watching a movie together, her mum confessed to her that her father was an American sailor. She said that she was deeply in love with him and that the pair had a relationship before he was suddenly forced to leave the country. Shortly afterwards, Wendy’s mother discovered that she was pregnant.

Now Wendy has turned to Long Lost Family in a desperate bid to find the father that she never had a chance to know and who never had a chance to know her.

Wendy’s search starts on the iconic Craigavon Bridge that divides Derry – the Protestant North from the Catholic South. It is here that Wendy’s father, an American sailor, was last seen the night he was expelled from Northern Ireland.

Wendy tell the programme about the moment she learned about her dad, when her mum, Sarah, told her that her father was a man called Grant, an American sailor who had been stationed in Derry. Wendy explains that over the following weeks more information emerged.

Wendy learned that her mother and Grant had been very much in love. They’d met in the summer of 1975 and spent every moment they could together. But circumstances were difficult. Sarah’s parents were wary of the dashing American courting their daughter and the politics of the time meant contact between the two required Grant to cross from one side of Derry to another.

His constant trips back and forth raised suspicions with the British who expected the Americans to remain impartial. They suspected his constant movement between the Protestant North and Catholic South was an indication of sympathy towards the IRA and, after Grant got involved in a fight on the Craigavon Bridge, he was deported.

Sarah was heartbroken and especially devastated when she discovered she was pregnant with his child. She discovered he had been posted to sea and the pair began writing.

Sarah tells the programme: “It was the only thing that gave me hope, getting these letters and me sending letters to him. For the child that I was carrying.”

The programme reveals that seven months later Sarah gave birth to Wendy and immediately sent Grant a photograph of their newborn baby. But she heard nothing back, and, after repeatedly trying to get in contact, she eventually gave up, believing he had met someone else and moved on.

Then, when Wendy was a teenager, she discovered that her grandfather, in a desperate attempt to protect his daughter, had intercepted the letters Grant had sent and concealed them from Sarah.

Wendy tells the programme that discovering that Grant had continued to write was the reassurance she needed to believe that he had cared, and hadn’t simply deserted Sarah and their baby.

She explains how, over the years, she never stopped thinking of her father and spent hours at the computer trying to discover where he was. She managed to find an old colleague of his who was able to give her an old photo.

She says: “I thought a photo would have been enough. I was so excited. But it’s not. I just need to know who he is. I need to know him and maybe understand why he hasn’t come looking. I would like to know.”

Long Lost Family’s search led to the town of Albuquerque in New Mexico, where Grant now lives.

Nicky travels to New Mexico to meet Grant, who reveals that he has treasured the tiny photo of Wendy ever since he received it.

He says: “I looked at that picture a lot for a long time. I wrote her that I wanted to come back and possibly go to school down in Dublin at the University to finish my engineering degree.”

Grant explains that he never heard back from Sarah and he assumed she had forgotten about him and moved on with her life. He is stunned when Nicky reveals that his letters were intercepted.

Davina tells Wendy that her father has been found and is making the 5000 mile journey to meet her.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Turtle » Wed Jul 03, 2013 11:21 am

Just catching up with this thread now, so I am commenting on three shows at once.

Read in the Radio Times this morning that "Only those with a stone for a heart could fail to shed a tear at the reunions". Oh, dear, that must be me! I haven't seen this programme before, so I watched with interest. I do find it touching, but my stone heart isn't responding. Interesting it says that next week's episode is "about a man who admits he doesn't show emotion, which he puts down to a fear of rejection ever since he discovered he was adopted". That is also me. The way people spoke about this programme on here, I felt that I might feel some deeper connection to it. I just haven't felt that yet. I can empathise with the stories that are told, but I don't seen to get as deeply involved as some others do. Maybe this is also why I don't seek a reunion. That I just don't feel that emotional connection. I'm just not that sort of person. I do keep the world at arm's length. It's a protection thing.

I did like in the first program the b.mother who gave her daughter her grandmother's ring. What a gift. I don't mean that from a financial point of view. She could have given her a pebble off a beach, that the grandmother had found. I do find that lack of tangible things in my life hard. Most of us treasure things that are connected to people - a stoneware vase that my mother gave me because I had gone on about it so much, an aspidistra that belonged to a great aunt and has been passed down through the generations, these are things that, if the house caught fire, I would save. In fact, having got my adoption files recently, I have realised that I must buy a firebox to put them in, as if I lost those, I would be distraught.

I also admired the a.mother in the first program. She seemed so balanced and kind. She was so open to the reunion. I did feel for her.

I think it is sad how some of the other family members have influenced things. The father that disowned his pregnant, teenage daughter....the mother who didn't want her sons to contact their father. It shows how other family members have such an influence over the things that happen.

I must say, I would like a more balanced view of the adoption scenario. No doubt, these tearful reunions make great tv, but we all know that these aren't necessarily the normal outcome when children approach their b.parents or visa versa. There are so many people involved who have to be open to the idea, and so many expectations of what the outcome should be. We don't get to see the rejections or the cases where after a few meetings, things break down. I think it would be nice to have a programme that dealt with the real side of things, not just the fairy tale endings.

Still it is good seeing adoption dealt with in the media, even if it is one sided.

I must admit, I do wonder what my mother thinks every time they advertise it. After all, you can't avoid it. Does she turn away, or watch it and wonder? Do friends talk about it the next day to her, and she still covers up what happened and brushes the programme off, or would she confide in a friend that it reflected her own life story? Perhaps her husband gives her the "evil eye" when it comes on. Does she even wonder if I am watching it? I would love to be a fly on the wall.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Lowrider Lincoln » Wed Jul 03, 2013 10:58 pm

Turtle wrote:
I must admit, I do wonder what my mother thinks every time they advertise it. After all, you can't avoid it. Does she turn away, or watch it and wonder? Do friends talk about it the next day to her, and she still covers up what happened and brushes the programme off, or would she confide in a friend that it reflected her own life story? Perhaps her husband gives her the "evil eye" when it comes on. Does she even wonder if I am watching it? I would love to be a fly on the wall.


Interesting comment Turtle, I have had the same thought as you. Is BM watching and wondering "what if ?" Is her ex husband watching with a smug look on his face ? Are my siblings watching totally unaware they have a half brother who is thinking of them ?

Regardless of the fact, LLF only shows conclusive and happy endings. It is still the only mainstream program to cover adoption related issues. They skirt through the tracing process in a matter of seconds, for most of us it's drawn out affair. They seem to pick the the 'candidates' that are living abroad, South Africa, America etc - it make great TV.

In reality a lot of reunions aren't as welcoming as the ones shown. Is it for the cameras ? Who knows.

Only a tiny proportion of the viewing public will be affected by adoption. For the most who are unaffected it must be viewed in a different light as we see it. It isn't factual drama, nor reality TV, certainly not 'feel good entertainment'. Could it be that everyone needs a weep now and then, like watching Bambi or a Lassie movie.

Davina makes a great host - very sensitive, comforting. Nicky, an adoptee himself - very understanding and supporting. Well filmed and edited. Prime time too.

Warts and all I like the program. It's not perfect but I can connect with the story line. Not necessarily wishing a reunion of my own or that missing feeling often quoted. It does highlight both sides of adoption - that is a good thing.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby Turtle » Thu Jul 04, 2013 7:18 am

Lowrider Lincoln wrote:Only a tiny proportion of the viewing public will be affected by adoption.


Strangely, when I talk to people about my adoption, most people then say that they know other adoptees. I have come across quite a few in my life. So we aren't that uncommon. However, how many people know the b.mother's that gave their children away? There are as many of them, as there are of us! Do we still live in a society where that is a taboo subject or is it that birth mother's never shake off the shame and the silence is self imposed?

It would be nice to see a more realistic programme. Something that shows the reality of tracing. The slow process of obtaining files, the doubt faced by people and the reality of reunions. It would be nice to just have one programme on that. I can't remember ever seeing anything on those subjects. Considering all the rubbish on tv, you would think that they could squeeze one such programme into their schedules.
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Re: ITV - Long Lost Family, series 3

Postby julie2009 » Tue Jul 09, 2013 3:53 pm

I have only watched the first episode and my heart went out to Susan and her heartless excuse of a father.
She couldn't make contact with her mum until he died. I think if he hadn't of been around it may have been a different story altogether but then who knows.
I was gobsmacked when she made contact with her father as her next-of-kin he said it would teach her a lesson and he couldn't have cared whether she lived or not. Luckily she met up with the daughter she gave away and even went on to meet Andrea's own mum.

I didn't get to see the second episode about the girl from Derry in Northern Ireland. That is where my own BM was from and yes the troubles at that time was the main reason for her decision to give me up well going by what her sister told me.

I too would like an update on previous reunions from series 1 and 2 as SBP has suggested. Maybe an idea when they are researching for the next series.

PS: I read an alarming thread on Digital Spy in relation to this programme about a woman who had been adopted but her adoptive mother happened to work with her birth mum and constantly reminded the child that she had done her the favour by giving her a home and she would turn out just like the person who gave birth to her - useless. I was almost in tears after reading her story like so many others. I have to count myself lucky with the set of parents I got like so many more on these forums

Julie xx
julie2009
 
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Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 2:42 pm
Location: co. antrim

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